Roadless area-intensive management trade-offs on Pacific Northwest national forests
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Roadless area-intensive management trade-offs on Pacific Northwest national forests

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Published by Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service in Portland, Or .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Forests and forestry -- Economic aspects -- Northwest, Pacific,
  • Forest management -- Northwest, Pacific,
  • Forest roads -- Northwest, Pacific

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesRoadless area intensive management trade-offs on Pacific Northwest national forests.
Statementby Robert M. Randall ... [et al.]
SeriesResearch paper PNW -- 258.
ContributionsRandall, Robert M.
The Physical Object
Pagination69 p. :
Number of Pages69
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14476432M
OCLC/WorldCa16730854

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Roadless area-intensive management trade-offs on Pacific Northwest National Forests / By Or.). Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Robert M. Randall and United States. Forest Service. Abstract. Issued Aug. Bibliography: p. . Author of An Operations Research Approach to Douglas-Fir Thinning, Roadless Area-Intensive Management Trade-Offs on Pacific Northwest National Forests, and Outracing Change/5. Roadless area-intensive management trade-offs on Pacific Northwest National Forests / ([Portland, Or.]: Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, ), by Or.) Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Robert M. Randall, and United States Forest Service (page images at. Extensive appendices provide detailed data about Pacific Northwest forests. Chronicling a century of the agency s management of almost 25 million acres of national forests and grasslands for the people of the United States, The U.S. Forest Service in the Pacific Northwest is a welcome and overdue by: 5.

The moist forests of the Pacific Northwest United States (PNW) are among the most naturally carbon rich ecoregions in the world. However, regional in-forest . The Pacific Northwest’s National Forests have astounding diversity, from the temperate rainforests along the coast to the dry Ponderosa pine forests near the interior West. These forests provide for an abundance of benefits from remote areas for wildlife, clean drinking water for our communities and spectacular recreation opportunities. In Community-Based Collaboration: Bridging Socio-Ecological Research and Practice, the volume's contributors offer an in-depth interdisciplinary exploration of what attracts people to this.   The National Forests of the Pacific Northwest do not disappoint. Filled with dense old-growth, volcanic mountains, rich rivers and countless adventures, they are a treasure not to be missed. As with all excursions to the outdoors, be sure you check conditions first and in this case, road conditions.

Conflict surrounding federal forest management—in particular the introduction of roads into roadless areas and the logging of old-growth forests—had grown in the preceding decades, but the US Forest Service (USFS) had been able to avert any substantial changes to its management objectives and agency mission, which prioritized timber Cited by: 8. Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station General Technical Report PNW-GTR October Assessment and Management of Animal Damage in Pacific Northwest Forests: An Annotated Bibliography Donna M. Loucks, Hugh C. Black, Mary Lynn Roush, and Steven R. Radosevich I This file was created by scanning the printed : D.M. Loucks, H.C. Black, M.L. Roush, S.R. Radosevich. Roadless area: intensive management trade-offs on the Bridger-Teton and Lolo National Forests / View Metadata By: Bell, Enoch F. - Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Ogden, Utah). The Northwest has been at the forefront of forest management and research in the United States for more than one hundred years. In The U.S. Forest Service in the Pacific Northwest, Gerald Williams provides an historical overview of the part the Forest Service has played in managing the Northwest’s forests.. Emphasizing changes in management policy over the .